Stephen M. Hahn logo The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center logo

Stephen M. Hahn

Deputy President and Chief Operating Officer, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (USA)


Stephen Hahn, M.D., was named MD Anderson’s Deputy President and Chief Operating Officer in February 2017. In this role, he is responsible for day-to-day management of the institution, ensuring excellence across all business, clinical and faculty matters. Hahn joined MD Anderson in 2015 as division head, department chair and professor of Radiation Oncology. Prior to that, he served as chair of the Radiation Oncology department the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine from 2005 to 2014.

As a radiation oncologist, Hahn specializes in treating both lung cancer and sarcoma. His research focuses on the molecular causes of the tumor microenvironment, particularly the study of chemical signals that go awry (known as aberrant signal transduction pathways), and the evaluation of proton therapy as a means to improve the efficiency of radiation therapy.

Stephen M. Hahn logo

Stephen M. Hahn

Deputy President and Chief Operating Officer, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (USA)


The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center logo

Stephen Hahn, M.D., was named MD Anderson’s Deputy President and Chief Operating Officer in February 2017. In this role, he is responsible for day-to-day management of the institution, ensuring excellence across all business, clinical and faculty matters. Hahn joined MD Anderson in 2015 as division head, department chair and professor of Radiation Oncology. Prior to that, he served as chair of the Radiation Oncology department the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine from 2005 to 2014.

As a radiation oncologist, Hahn specializes in treating both lung cancer and sarcoma. His research focuses on the molecular causes of the tumor microenvironment, particularly the study of chemical signals that go awry (known as aberrant signal transduction pathways), and the evaluation of proton therapy as a means to improve the efficiency of radiation therapy.


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